Recipe: Celery sticks with nutritional yeast furikake, sesame oil and soy

I came up with this dish during my current residency at Rush Lane and Co in Toronto while searching for a snack that would satisfy the cravings of cocktail-swilling clients that went beyond the lazy route of simply deep-frying something.

I can’t take full credit for this celery dish: I wish I was inspired by some innate genius, but, like many of the dishes I do, I got the initial idea from somewhere on the internet. Still, it took a week or so of R&D, during which I tweaked the ratios nine or 10 times to get the balance right.

Furikake is a Japanese condiment that is usually eaten with rice. My version has untraditional ingredients that I believe add a lot of flavour. Buy or borrow a cheap digital scale, as this is one of those recipes that are so infuriatingly inaccurate and annoying when done with tablespoons and teaspoons that they aren’t worth making.

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Servings: 4

Celery sticks with nutritional yeast furikake, sesame oil and soy

4t toasted sesame oil

2t water

4T furikake (recipe follows)

4 celery sticks cut into batons about 7cm x 1.5cm

Soy sauce to taste

Furikake (makes 1L, freeze rest for later use for up to 6 months)

50g nutritional yeast

50g bonito flakes

40g sushi nori , torn into bite size pieces

5g salt

40g dried anchovy

30g sunflower seeds (crushed into powder in mortar & pestle, coffee grinder or blender)

25g black sesame (crushed into powder in mortar & pestle, coffee grinder or blender)

25g white sesame (crushed into powder in mortar & pestle, coffee grinder or blender)

Method

First, make the furikake. Put the nutritional yeast, bonito flakes, sushi nori, salt and dried anchovy into a food processor and blend until it is a quite fine powder. Mix with rest of ingredients.

Make a paste of seseame oil, water and furikake. Mix in the celery batons, making sure to coat the sticks evenly. Taste: the dish should be quite salty and very umami with a lovely refreshing undertone of the celery. Add soy or more furikake to get the salt level you desire.

Let sit for 10 minutes and then serve as a snack at a cocktail party or just before dinner.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Recipe: Gramma’s Crispy Cookies

My grandmother, Eunice Cammack, was known far and wide for her delicious and bountiful baking and cooking. Seeing her always meant being greeted with a warm kiss, and the guarantee that you wouldn’t be leaving hungry.

Gramma was a master hostess who loved a great party. She never discovered any recipe too daunting and spent hours toiling over a hot stove. Her “asbestos fingers” (as she used to call them) were impervious to heat as she nimbly popped items in and out of the oven. Virtually gliding as she moved about the room, she was a master in what professional cooks refer to as “the dance” from stove to counter to fridge and back again.

It was Gramma’s love of food and sharing it with other people that spawned my first fascination in the kitchen. But sadly it was just after her recent departure that I truly started to understand just how much work she was able to put into cooking and caring for all those fortunate enough to be about her. Her driveway could have inspired even the most diehard of hamburgers. She never whined as she worked out, constantly singing along to the AM radio on in the background.

These Crispy Cookies, which her humble home kitchen seemed to turn out in droves just like a mill, were among her staples. At any given time, there were at least a few dozen available, more than sufficient to settle a departure grandchild’s craving or to pleasantly surprise the strange tradesman who’d stopped in to do some repairs.

They are very simply crispy and flavorful, and in sharing them with you, I continue to hold dear to my heart the fond memories I have of my Gramma and the heritage of recipes she’s left behind.

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Servings: Yields 72, if you scoop them just Perfect

Ingredients

3 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1 cup butter, softened

1 cup white sugar

1 cup packed brown sugar

1 egg

1 cup canola oil

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup rolled oats (or instantaneous)

1 cup Rice Krispies

1 cup slightly crushed Cornflakes

1/2 cup flaked coconut

1/4 cup chopped pecans

1/4 cup sliced almonds, or peanuts

1/4 cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 325.

Strategy

Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.

Combine flour, baking soda and salt in a skillet and set aside.

In a mixing bowl, cream butter with both sugars on medium speed. Beat in egg until light and fluffy. Stir in vanilla and oil until combined.

Add dry ingredients and blend until smooth. Stir in remaining ingredients and blend well, with love.

Spoon onto cookie sheets, pressing softly into rounds. Bake 12 to 15 minutes, until light golden brown. For the crispiest biscuits, use Eunice’s technique: push with a fork halfway through baking.

Cool five minutes before transferring to cooling rack to cool completely.

Enjoy!

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Recipe: Gramma’s Crispy Cookies


My grandmother, Eunice Cammack, was known far and wide for her delicious and bountiful baking and cooking. Seeing her always meant being greeted with a warm kiss, and the guarantee that you wouldn’t be leaving hungry.

Gramma was a master hostess who loved a great party. She never discovered any recipe too daunting and spent hours toiling over a hot stove. Her “asbestos fingers” (as she used to call them) were impervious to heat as she nimbly popped items in and out of the oven. Virtually gliding as she moved about the room, she was a master in what professional cooks refer to as “the dance” from stove to counter to fridge and back again.

It was Gramma’s love of food and sharing it with other people that spawned my first fascination in the kitchen. But sadly it was just after her recent departure that I truly started to understand just how much work she was able to put into cooking and caring for all those fortunate enough to be about her. Her driveway could have inspired even the most diehard of cooks. She never whined as she worked out, constantly singing along to the AM radio in the background.

These Crispy Cookies, which her humble home kitchen seemed to turn out in droves just like a mill, were among her staples. At any given time, there were at least a few dozen on hand, more than sufficient to settle a departure grandchild’s craving or to pleasantly surprise the strange tradesman who’d stopped in to do some repairs.

They are very simply crispy and flavorful, and in sharing them with you, I continue to hold dear to my heart the fond memories I have of my Gramma and the heritage of recipes she’s left behind.

Visit To register for the Globe Style e-newsletter, your weekly digital guide to the players and trends influencing style, design and entertaining, plus shopping tips and inspiration for living well. And follow Globe Style on Instagram .

Servings: Yields 72, if you scoop them just Perfect

Ingredients

3 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1 cup butter, softened

1 cup white sugar

1 cup packed brown sugar

1 egg

1 cup canola oil

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup rolled oats (or instantaneous)

1 cup Rice Krispies

1 cup slightly crushed Cornflakes

1/2 cup flaked coconut

1/4 cup chopped pecans

1/4 cup sliced almonds, or peanuts

1/4 cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 325.

Strategy

Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.

Combine flour, baking soda and salt in a skillet and set aside.

In a mixing bowl, cream butter with both sugars on medium speed. Beat in egg until light and fluffy. Stir in vanilla and oil until combined.

Add dry ingredients and blend until smooth. Stir in remaining ingredients and blend well, with love.

Spoon onto cookie sheets, pressing softly into rounds. Bake 12 to 15 minutes, until light golden brown. For the crispiest biscuits, use Eunice’s technique: push with a fork halfway through baking.

Cool five minutes before transferring to cooling rack to cool completely.

Enjoy!

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Recipe: Perfect braised brisket


Brisket can mean various things to different people — barbecue enthusiasts, as an instance, wouldn’t dream of eating the fatty piece of beef another way than tenderized by a smoker, partnered with a dry rub and skillet.

For our loved ones, classic brisket is a braised cut of beef that’s simmered with onions and carrots and served as a centrepiece at important parties — notably Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year beginning on September 20.

The odor of a brisket braising in the oven is the odor of tradition and home for many Jewish families.

But making one takes a good amount of time and elbow grease. We wondered if we could simplify the procedure and decided to try it a variety of different ways: in a slow cooker, pressure cooker and conventional Dutch oven.

Those who’ve been following the Waverman lively may remember that Emma believes the slow cooker a poor cooking instrument but is ready to use it as it takes the strain out of dinner.

Over the last year, she’s become slightly evangelical about her Immediate Pot, a techy pressure cooker which heats food into a higher temperature compared to the slow cooker. Since it’s a stainless steel interior, food can be sautéed in it, making more browning and caramelization.

The challenge this week was to compare three briskets each made with a different method. We were not surprised that conventional braising won out on preference, but the Immediate Pot was a close second.

Unfortunately for slow-cooker fans, that brisket paled compared to the other two — the flavours weren’t as balanced and intense, and the feel was somewhat soggy. The meat was quickly re-purposed for soup.

Do not wait for a special event to produce a brisket. It is a one-pot dish that tastes better as leftovers and may be a family tradition any day of the year.

—–

Lessons learned from cooking brisket three ways

The slow cooker could be the simplest way to go but the outcomes were our least favorite. It is a practically hands-off endeavor, but the braising liquid is thin and almost flavourless, the vegetables are abandoned rigged as well as the meat was soggy.

The Immediate Pot is the quick method, taking just one hour and a half. One great aspect of this appliance is its sauté setting, letting you brown the brisket as you want in a kettle on the stove. When the meat is tender, then use the sauté setting again to decrease the sauce until thickened and concentrated. The meat had some browning and has been the second most tender. The sauce had plenty of flavour once decreased and the vegetables were tender and had some flavour.

The traditional method of browning on the cooker and braising in the oven provides the most delicious results. The sauce was thickened and concentrated, and the meat was nicely browned and extremely tender. This brisket was hands down our favorite.

Servings: 6-8

Brisket 101

2 tbsp Dijon mustard

1 tbsp soy sauce

1 tsp dried thyme

1 4-lb brisket

Salt and pepper

2 tbsp vegetable oil

4 carrots, about 1 pounds

4 cups chopped onion, about 2

1 head garlic cut in half

2 cups beef or chicken stock

1 cup chopped canned tomatoes

1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Pinch chili flakes

Strategy

Slow cooker

Combine mustard, soy, thyme and pepper. Sprinkle salt over the brisket then brush with marinade. Broil the fat side of the brisket until it becomes brown and nice. Place half of the carrots and onions and all the garlic on the bottom of this slow cooker. Top with brisket. Cover with remaining onions, carrots and garlic. Add stock and canned tomatoes. Stir in vinegar and chili flakes. Cover and cook on low for eight hours.

Electric pressure cooker/Instant Pot

Combine mustard, soy sauce and simmer in a small bowl.

Season brisket with salt and pepper and brush lightly with mustard mixture.

Heat oil in Immediate Pot on sauté setting, found. Add brisket and cook until golden brown, about 4 minutes each side. If the brisket is too large to brown, cut it in half. Remove to a platter.

Add onions and carrots to Immediate Pot and sauté until onions start to soften, scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, about 2 minutes. Stir in garlic.

Return brisket to Immediate Pot, nestling it into the vegetables. Add stock, tomato, balsamic vinegar and chili flakes.

Close lid and valve to “sealing.”

Set Instant Pot on manual for 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, release pressure obviously, about 15 minutes, then turn valve to “venting.”

Carefully remove meat and vegetables to a platter and keep warm. Set dial to sauté and simmer liquid until reduced to 3 cups, about 15 minutes. Slice brisket and serve with sauce and vegetables.

Traditional braise

A hefty cast-iron enamel Dutch oven is the best for this.

Combine mustard, soy sauce and simmer in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Brush mustard marinade over brisket. Heat 2 tbsp oil in Dutch oven and brown brisket on both sides (or broil). Add carrots and onions to casserole and sauté for 1 minute. Add brisket and stock and tomatoes. Stir in vinegar and chili flakes. Bake for 5 to 6 hours or until fork tender.

Tips

– For a really tender brisket, receive a double, which has a milder end and much more fat.

– The simplest way to eliminate the fat is to earn the meat the day before serving and refrigerate in broth overnight. Remove any fat and slice the brisket while chilly, then return to gravy to simmer for thirty minutes in a covered dish medium-low heat or until bubbling. It may also be reheated in a slow cooker.

– A large brisket can easily serve a dinner party, but the best part is that the leftovers. A brisket sandwich on thick pieces of challah smothered in gravy is your obvious option. Adding brisket into a simple fried rice, beef and barley soup or a tomato sauce for mock Bolognese is a superb way to use up extra meat.

– If you like a glaze, remove the brisket after ingestion, and brush a mixture of two tablespoons maple syrup, 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard and 1 tablespoon Sriracha. Bake for thirty minutes at 350 F. Slice the meat and return it to the sauce. This gives an additional layer of flavour but is not entirely necessary.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Recipe: Roast chicken


Setting up a new kitchen and cooking for guests can be an intimidating undertaking. So along with our , we’d love to pass on a single recipe that is essential — how to roast a chicken. Don’t hesitate: There are hardly any dishes that are as simple and useful to pull off as a roast chicken.

This one basic recipe will enable you to have friends for dinner, or cook for yourself with two or three days of yummy leftovers. Additionally, the smell of roast chicken turns a house into a house.

Chickens are often roasted on a rack but with a skillet and throwing in some onions and carrots makes it a one-pot meal. Purchase the best chicken you are able, as air-dried and obviously raised tastes far better.

Make two and you’ll have sufficient food for a week. , which is endlessly helpful.

Servings: 4

Ingredients

1 3-4 lb (1.5 to 2 kg) whole chicken, rather naturally raised

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1 tsp salt

1 teaspoon dried herbs, either tarragon, thyme or rosemary

1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper

1/2 tsp grated lemon rind

1/2 tsp finely grated garlic

3 carrots, about 3/4 pounds

1 largish onion, cooking or Spanish

Strategy

Preheat oven to 400 F. Dry chicken with paper towels.

Combine 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt, herbs, pepper, garlic and lemon. Rub marinade over chicken pushing a few under skin if possible.

Do not bother peeling the carrots: simply wash them. Peel the onion. Cut the onion in half then cut each half into 4 wedges. Cut the carrots in 2-inch pieces. Scatter onions and carrots on the bottom of a frying pan, skillet or broiler pan. Toss vegetables with remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil.

Put chicken on top of onion and carrot. If you would like potatoes, add them also.

Roast chicken until well-browned and juices run clear. A simple guide is 15 minutes per pound (500 g) with 15 minutes tacked on the end, so 1 hour to get a 3-lb chicken, 1 hour, 15 minutes to get a 4-lb.

Let rest for 10 minutes. Put on a carving board or a plate. Using a large knife remove the thigh and legs in 1 piece on either side.

Remove wings and eat yourself — they are the cook’s treat! Cut through breast to split into two pieces. If it’s large, divide in half {}.

Serve to your friends with the carrots and onions.

To make a fast sauce (about 1 1/2 cups), remove carrots and onions from pan, and pour off all but 2 tbsp of the remaining fat.

Put on stove over medium heat and stir in 2 tablespoons flour. Cook for a minute or two or until flour colours slightly. Add 2 cups chicken stock, preferably low-salt, bring to a boil while stirring. Reduce heat and simmer for a few minutes until desired consistency.

To get a richer gravy, you can add in about 1 tablespoon of tomato paste, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, mustard or your favorite spices or herbs.

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Recipe: Roast chicken


Setting up a new kitchen and cooking for guests can be an intimidating undertaking. So along with our , we’d love to pass on a single recipe that is essential — how to roast a chicken. Don’t hesitate: There are hardly any dishes that are as simple and useful to pull off as a roast chicken.

This one basic recipe will let you have friends for dinner, or cook for yourself with two or three days of yummy leftovers. Additionally, the smell of roast chicken turns a house into a house.

Chickens are often roasted on a rack but with a skillet and throwing in some onions and carrots makes it a one-pot meal. Purchase the best chicken you are able, as air-dried and obviously raised tastes far better.

Make two and you’ll have enough food for a week. , which is endlessly helpful.

  • Servings: 4

Ingredients

1 3-4 lb (1.5 to 2 kg) whole chicken, rather naturally raised

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1 tsp salt

1 teaspoon dried herbs, either tarragon, thyme or rosemary

1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper

1/2 tsp grated lemon rind

1/2 tsp finely grated garlic

3 carrots, about 3/4 pounds

1 largish onion, cooking or Spanish

Method

Preheat oven to 400 F. Dry chicken with paper towels.

Combine 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt, herbs, pepper, garlic and lemon. Rub marinade over chicken pushing some under skin if possible.

Do not bother peeling the carrots: simply wash them. Peel the onion. Cut the onion in half then cut each half into 4 wedges. Cut the carrots in 2-inch pieces. Scatter onions and carrots on the bottom of a frying pan, skillet or broiler pan. Toss vegetables with remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil.

Put chicken on top of onion and carrot. If you prefer potatoes, add them also.

Roast chicken until well-browned and juices run clear. A simple guide is 15 minutes per pound (500 g) with 15 minutes tacked on the end, so 1 hour to get a 3-lb chicken, 1 hour, 15 minutes to get a 4-lb.

Let rest for 10 minutes. Put on a carving board or a plate. Using a large knife remove the thigh and legs in 1 piece on either side.

Remove wings and eat yourself — they are the cook’s treat! Cut through breast to split into two pieces. If it’s large, divide in half {}.

Serve to your friends with the carrots and onions.

To make a fast sauce (about 1 1/2 cups), remove carrots and onions from pan, and pour off all but 2 tbsp of the remaining fat.

Put on stove over medium heat and stir in 2 tablespoons flour. Cook for a minute or two or until flour colours slightly. Add 2 cups chicken stock, preferably low-salt, bring to a boil while stirring. Reduce heat and simmer for a few minutes until desired consistency.

To get a richer gravy, you can add in about 1 tablespoon of tomato paste, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, mustard or your favorite spices or herbs.

Recipe potato salad


I spent two weeks last month in B.C., camping on a farm and cooking farm-to-table dinners. Since it a reminder of how much tears, sweat and work go, I attempt to do this each year. It makes me respect the products I work with this.

Another thing about being on farms is currently coming that you can not find in the supermarket. Zack, the farmer I worked with, introduced me a potato, to the Makah Ozette. The Ozette was a staple in the diet of the Makah Indians ever since it was introduced to them by Spanish explorers in the 1700s.

When young the potato happens to be delicious and buttery. I wound up creating a batch into a salad, with kettle chips for richness and an unexpected complexity. The potatoes will need to be vinegary to balance the richness of the chips.

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  • Servings: 4 as a side

Ingredients

2 cups Ozette potatoes (or other fresh potatoes), boiled in salted water and cut to bite-sized bits and left at room temperature

4 tablespoons olive oil

1/4 cup grainy mustard

1/4 cup high apple cider vinegar

Salt to taste

1 handful flat leaf parsley, finely chopped

2 green onions

4 tablespoons cream

2 handfuls kettle chips

Method

Mix the potatoes with the olive oil in a bowl. Add the vinegar and the mustard a few spoonfuls at a time, tasting the way: you might not have to bring either all, based on your taste and the products you use. Season with salt.

Fold in the herbs and taste. Adjust seasoning.

Smear cream all around the bottom of a dish. Potatoes over the cream. Potatoes chips over and serve.

Recipe: Cauliflower Curry curry

If desired, add chickpeas that are hot just before serving.

  • Servings: 4

Cauliflower Potato Curry

1/4 cup vegetable oil

1 tablespoon black mustard seeds

2 tsp ground coriander

2 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp garam masala

1 tsp ground turmeric

1 small head cauliflower, about 1 pound

3 potatoes

2 tomatoes

Garnish

2 tablespoons chopped fresh coriander

Method

Heat oil over moderate heat in skillet. Add coriander, mustard seeds, cumin, garam masala and garlic and sauté until mustard seeds start to pop, about 1 to 2 minutes. Cool. Cut cauliflower into florets. Cauliflower, potatoes and tomatoes with oil mixture.

Grill cauliflower, potatoes and tomatoes over medium-high heat until tender and lightly charred — about 8-10 minutes for potatoes about 4 minutes and cauliflower for berries. Cut potato slices in half. Chop up tomatoes. Cauliflower and potatoes with coriander and tomato.

Taste for seasoning adding salt and pepper .

Recipe: Corn Hushpuppies


These hushpuppies evoke the fairground: the odor of corn dogs and all manner of fried, savoury goodness hawked along with the midway.

There’s a tiny match in eating them, of holding fritter with fingertips to handle that bite of brittle exterior — to grab it at summit crunch against the fluff of a 45,,, a juggling trick. It’s a technique which needs pulling on the lips with the reward worth the risk that is small.

For those sensible to wait for them to cool, the rounds continue to be exceptionally tempting. The crust firms up together with the middle, with the sweetness of the corn kernels coming through. While cornmeal grants both lightness of crumb and a grit into the crust, A sidles up to indicate an awareness of green.

They’re made to partner when the weather turns but I have the idea to float them in a bowl of chili or chowder. Or onto a plate of ribs and beans for breakfast, or with eggs, legumes, and tomatoes in a barbecue. Their applications, and think of these as a more crusty cornbread, or muffin top are self explanatory.

Snatched as they’re cooked, they eaten straight while I make hushpuppies. As they’re cooked, but in case you serve them put a baking sheet lined with paper towels in a very low oven and move the fried, drained hushpuppies.

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  • Servings: Makes about 40 golf ball-sized fritters

For the sauce

1/3 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon prepared horseradish

1 tbsp buttermilk, plus more as needed

1 teaspoon honey or granulated sugar

2 tbsp minced herbs (chives, parsley, cilantro, basil, or a mixture)

Freshly-ground black pepper to taste

For the hushpuppies and to function

2 ears corn

1 tablespoon butter

2 shallots, minced

1 jalapeño, seeded and minced

2 tablespoons chopped herbs (chives, parsley, cilantro, basil, or a mixture)

2/3 cup buttermilk

1 1/4 cup all purpose flour

3/4 cup cornmeal

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1 1/4 tsp medium-grain kosher salt

2 eggs

Vegetable oil

Optional, salt

Honey

Southern-style or Mexican hot sauce (like Crystal or Cholula)

Optional or herbs that are additional, sprouts

Method

To make the sauce, stir together the mayonnaise, horseradish, buttermilk, honey, and herbs in a medium bowl. Taste for seasoning, adding pepper. The sauce should run off a spoon; if it is not, stir in buttermilk. If making in advance cover and refrigerate until needed, up to some hours. Check consistency prior to use.

With the corn, begin for the fritters. With a sharp knife, cut the kernels from the cobs. Set aside. On the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade the back of the knife against the stripped cobs to extract any milk. Discard the cobs.

In a medium skillet, melt the butter over moderate heat. Sauté the shallot until translucent once it’s foamed. Hint in the corn and continue to cook until the kernels are tender, stirring. It should take 3 to 5 minutes longer. Stir in the jalapeño for the last minute. Pull on the corn and fold in the herbs.

Pour into the food processor. Scrape from the corn, attach the lid, and process to a coarse purée. Let cool.

Whisk the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, sugar, baking soda, and salt in the bowl that the corn was in.

With the motor add the eggs. Decant the corn mixture. Stir until combined, being sure not to overmix.

Pour 2 inches of oil in a 5- or 6-quart Dutch oven. Heat medium-high to 350°F. With 2 strands or a scoop, place tablespoons of batter. Repeat frying a few not overcrowding the pan. Make certain all the way through and to keep as they bob turning the hushpuppies, so that they cook evenly. Fry around 3 minutes, until golden brown and light for their size. Drain on paper towels and season with salt or kosher that is extra.

To function, anoint the hushpuppies in amounts of your liking with honey and sauce. Either supply the sauce in a bowl or spoon overtop. Adorn with herbs or sprouts if using. Eat straight away.

Potato salad is taken on by an unconventional


I love midsummer, when vegetables begin to taste their best. As if to certify this statement, the farmer’s market near my mother’s place, last weekend was overflowing with prosperity and bounty. I happened across the loveliest and sweetest potatoes and I knew I had to make a potato salad.

This recipe takes a traditional approach since it does not include milk, eggs or mayo, but the outcome is creamy and packed with flavours. The secret is to construct the seasoning by ensuring the water beginning. Once cooked and well-strained mix with the dressing. As it is being stirred A creamy consistency will grow, and flavours are always absorbed by potatoes that are hot readily.

Chilli oil with beans is hands down one of my favorite condiments to have available at home or at the restaurant. It can be found at your local grocery industry.

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  • Servings: 6

Potato salad

2 new potatoes

1 540ml can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed

1 cup sweet onion, finely chopped

2 Tbsp chilli with beans in oil

3 Tbsp soy sauce

3 Tbsp rice vinegar

1 Tbsp sesame oil

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

10 grinds black pepper

1/2 tsp kosher salt

1 cup freshly shucked peas

Method

Cover with water and bring to a boil. Once boiling, turn down to medium heat and continue to simmer for 20 minutes or till the potatoes are well-cooked.

Prepare the nine ingredients and mix in a bowl. Allow to marinate while you cook the potatoes.

After cooked, strain the potatoes including them immediately stirring to blend. Allow to cool on the kitchen counter. Stir in peas. Continue to cool in the refrigerator.

Store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Can be made a day or two.